How to Improve Teamwork

Effective collaboration is key to helping organizations achieve their goals.

But creating and maintaining strong teams is easier said than done. There’s just too much work to do on a daily basis—deadlines to meet, reports to file, bosses to satisfy. So how can teams boost their performance?

Research on group dynamics shows that teams perform best when their members agree on rules related to goals, roles and norms. Teams that spend time talking out those three things tend to do better. As soon as people get together in any kind of group, they start putting rules together. The highest-performing teams understand the importance of constructing those rules carefully and deliberately.

The three steps to building better teams are:

Commit to the goals, roles and norms for guiding the team’s direction. Do you have a shared vision? Choose specific goals with clear and measurable targets. Take into account the team members’ values. What will inspire them? What’s in it for them?

Roles should be well-defined and should utilize the skills and interests of each person.

It’s also important to establish norms, which are the rules that help you manage communication, decision-making and conflict. Even when we think we understand, we misinterpret others’ intentions and fail to recognize our own assumptions about the way work should be done, the authors say.

Check alignment between the agreements that the team members made and what they are actually doing. Because your team behaviors become habit, it can be really hard to see when things get out of alignment. You have to be a really good observer of your own culture.

Enlisting the help of an outside onlooker could help you see the gaps between what your team members are saying and what they’re doing. Or appoint a team member to play devil’s advocate and ask the tough questions. But first, you must create a psychologically safe space so that team members feel it’s safe to speak their minds.

Two common biases frequently lead to teams getting off track. When a project is successful, teams seldom bother to investigate processes that might have produced negative results under slightly different circumstances. This is called “overvaluing outcomes.” Another common bias is “motivated blindness,” which occurs when team members don’t look for problems because their paychecks depend on a project’s completion.

The solution? Search for evidence that disproves your beliefs to ensure that you are not letting your own interests cloud your judgment, the authors say.

Close the gap between what team members are saying and doing. To bring the team back into alignment with its goals, determine small, specific steps the team can take to get back on track. Carve out time to work on them, and be realistic about the obstacles you might encounter along the way.  Highlight the positive impact the changes will have.

 

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About Fuwad Junaidi

My professional qualifications include a sound understanding of HR policies and processes coupled with the requisite technical expertise for resolving complex functional business issues across a wide spectrum of HR modules... Furthermore my experience as a Human Resources Professional in different organizations has prepared me for the challenges associated with a deep involved in management and development of Human Resources career strategies. I had developed Standard Operating Procedures for the entire HR processes that are being implemented successfully in order to meet organizational needs... Specialties HR Policy Formulation(Designing& Implementation) Job Evaluation Recruitment & Selection(Manpower Demand & Supply analysis,Recruitment Cycle layout,Interviewing,Selection,Orientation & Placement) Training & Development( Training Need Analysis,Training Design,Implementaion &Evaluation) Performance Management Employee Relations HR Data Maintenance Organizational Development

Posted on April 3, 2017, in How to be Creative, Relationship Management. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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